BANANA:


(North America; UK; Malaysia) an Asian person living in a Western country (e.g., an Asian American) who is yellow on the outside, white on the inside. Used primarily by Asians to indicate someone who has lost touch with the cultural identity of his or her parents.[11]


Chinese context: This term is related to the Cantonese slang Jook-sing or zuk-sing (竹升), which refers to an overseas Chinese person who was born in a Western environment or a Chinese person who more readily or strongly identifies with Western culture than traditional Chinese culture.[2]

APPLE:


(North America) an American Indian (Native American) who is "red on the outside, white on the inside." Used primarily by other American Indians to indicate someone who has lost touch with their cultural identity. First used in the 1970s.[8]

COCONUT:


(UK) a brown person of South Asian descent who has assimilated into Western culture.[59][60][61]

(New Zealand/Australia) a Pacific Islander. Named after the coconut, the nut from the coconut palm; in the American sense, it derives from the fact that a coconut is brown on the outside and white on the inside (see also "Oreo" below).[62]

OREO:

(US) black on the outside and white on the inside, hinted by the appearance of an Oreo cookie.[152][153]

Used as early as the 1960s.[154]

(US) white on the outside and black on the inside.

A white person who acts black, or has black inheritance but appears to be white.


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